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Mortgage Payment Shock Calculator

A significant number of Canadians are set to face payment shock, with 60% of mortgages coming up for renewal in the next 3 years. This means many homeowners will face much higher mortgage payments at renewal unless interest rates decrease significantly over the next few years. This unexpected increase in financial obligations can be stressful if you’re unprepared. 

What is Payment Shock?

Payment shock is a sudden and substantial increase in mortgage payments. Payment shock typically occurs when mortgage rates increase in quick succession or a mortgage is renewed at a much higher rate. The most significant impact of payment shock is the financial strain on homeowners’ budgets.

What Causes Payment Shock?

Payment shock doesn’t just occur when you renew your mortgage. Several other causes of payment shock can negatively impact your finances. 

Rate Changes at Renewal

One of the primary causes of payment shock is rate changes at renewal. Most mortgages renew after 5 years (the most popular term), and you must renew your mortgage at current interest rates. If rates have increased significantly since you first obtained the mortgage or since your last renewal, this can substantially increase your mortgage payments, causing payment shock. 

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages

Adjustable-rate mortgages (ARM) have payments that fluctuate based on changes to lender prime rates. When interest rates increase or decrease, an ARM payment will adjust, either increasing or decreasing, to account for changes in interest rates while the principal portion remains the same. If interest rates increase, you will immediately feel the effects through higher mortgage payments. This could lead to payment shock if rates continue to increase, causing your mortgage payments to increase much higher than your initial payments.   

Escrow Account Adjustments

Some homeowners may choose to have their property taxes included with their mortgage payments. When a lender collects property taxes along with regularly scheduled mortgage payments, the portion of property taxes made is held in an escrow account. There may be times when this account doesn’t have enough to cover the total property taxes owed for the year. 

If property taxes increase, most lenders will allow the escrow account to go negative and re-adjust mortgage payments after the current year’s property tax payments are made. The re-adjustment will account for the repayment of any negative balance and will budget enough to cover the new property taxes, increasing your mortgage payments in the process. Property taxes can significantly increase due to municipal budget increases or property value reassessments leading to payment shock.  

Changes in Mortgage Terms

To significantly change your mortgage terms, you must complete a mortgage refinance. With a refinance, you will break your current mortgage and sign on for a new one at current interest rates. If rates are significantly higher than your current interest rate, you could face payment shock when refinancing.

How to Calculate Payment Shock

Understanding how to calculate payment shock can help you plan ahead for changes to your budget. The payment shock calculation method you use will depend on the type of scenario you face. 

Calculating Payment Shock at Renewal: 

To calculate payment shock at renewal, you will need to compare your current mortgage payments with what they will be at renewal. The difference will be expressed as a percentage to illustrate the shock you will realize once your payments change. 

Payment Shock = (New Payment – Old Payment) / Old Payment * 100 

Calculating Payment Shock for Adjustable-rate Mortgages:

For adjustable-rate mortgages, you will need to compare your original mortgage payment at the onset of your mortgage term to the new payment each time rates change. This difference is calculated as the adjustment to your mortgage payment with each increase to your lender’s prime rate. 

Payment Shock = (New Payment – Original Payment) / Original Payment * 100 

Calculating Payment Shock When Changing Mortgage Terms:

When changing mortgage terms, you will calculate the difference between your current mortgage payments and those made under the new mortgage. The percentage change will be the payment shock you will realize once you are on your new mortgage rate. 

Payment Shock = (New Payment – Old Payment) / Old Payment * 100

Today’s Best Mortgage Rates as of April 24, 2024

The Great Renewal: How 60% of Canadian Mortgages are at Risk of Payment Shock in 2024-2026

A significant number of Canadians are set to renew mortgages over the next 3 years. Around 60% of outstanding mortgages at chartered banks are estimated to be coming due between 2024 and 2026. RBC’s Imagine Capital Markets Report on Canadian banks and mortgage payment shock estimates that just over $900 billion in mortgages will be up for renewal over the next 3 years. 

CMHC estimates that 45%, or 2.2 million mortgages, will be up for renewal between 2024 and 2025. This figure represents nearly 40% of the Canadian economy’s gross domestic product (GDP). These borrowers will face the most significant interest rate shock as many secured record low interest rates between 2020 and 2021 during the pandemic and will most likely renew at 23-year highs.   

To put this into perspective, if you secured an interest rate at nesto in August 2020, you could have secured a 5-year fixed rate at 1.79%. This would put you up for renewal in August 2025. If interest rates don’t come down before then, you could be looking at an interest rate of around 4.74% using today’s lowest  5-year rate at nesto. 

Using this data, if you originally had a $500,000 mortgage with a 25-year amortization and a 5-year term at 1.79%, your monthly mortgage payments would be about $2,067, and you’d have approximately $417,000 remaining on your mortgage when you are renewing your mortgage in 2025. At renewal, your mortgage payments at a 4.74% interest rate would increase to $2,682. 

($2,682 – $2,067) / $2,067 *100 = 29.75%

When you renew, your monthly mortgage payments could increase by $615 ($7,380/year) as you realize a 29.75% mortgage payment shock. Even though your mortgage balance decreased, your mortgage payments have increased without any effective change to your amortization schedule. If fixed rates moved higher before your renewal, you risk a much higher payment shock. 

How Canadians Can Reduce Their Payment Shock

Despite the looming threat of payment shock if your mortgage is up for renewal in the next few years, there are several strategies you could take to lessen the impact on your finances. 

  • Increase mortgage payments – Increasing your mortgage payments before your term ends, especially if you have a lower interest rate today, will help you pay down more principal on your mortgage. This could lower your remaining mortgage amount when you come up for renewal and help offset some of the increase in payments you will face if rates remain high. 
  • Make a lump sum prepayment – Similar to increasing your mortgage payments, a lump sum payment will go toward the principal on your mortgage. This could reduce the remaining mortgage amount when you come up for renewal and help offset some of the impacts of higher interest rates. 
  • Extend your amortizationExtending your amortization will spread out your mortgage payments over a longer timeframe, helping offset some of the costs of higher interest rates. However, this option will mean you pay more in interest-carrying costs over the life of the mortgage. 
  • Shop around for the lowest rates – Shopping around and switching lenders for a lower rate could save you thousands in interest-carrying costs. nesto provides a hassle-free way to help you find the lower rates.   
  • Select an adjustable-rate or short-term fixed-rate mortgage – Locking into a 5-year fixed rate when rates are at all-time highs could mean you miss out on savings if rates decrease. Choosing an adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) will allow you to realize immediate savings if interest rates start to come down. However, if you prefer predictable and stable payments, a short-term fixed-rate mortgage could help you secure a lower rate when you come up for renewal in the next few years. 

How Payment Shock Compares Against the Big Banks

The impact of payment shock can vary depending on your mortgage lender and the interest rate you currently have. Many of the major banks have been vocal about the risk of payment shock and have increased their financial buffers to hedge against any potential loan defaults that may occur. However, most borrowers prioritize their mortgage payments over other debt repayments, investing and spending, so the risk of defaults remains relatively low. 

If you originally obtained a $500,000 mortgage in 2019 on a 5-year fixed rate with a 25-year amortization at an interest rate of 2.83%, your monthly mortgage payments would be approximately $2,323. When your mortgage matures at the end of your 5-year term in 2024, you will have approximately $426,000 left on your mortgage balance. 

The tables below illustrate the payment shock you would experience when renewing your outstanding mortgage balance of $426,000 at each of the big 6 banks using today’s rates and compare how much you could save by switching from the big banks to nesto.    

RBC Payment Shock

RBCnesto
Mortgage Amount (at renewal)$426,000$426,000
Interest Rate5.59%4.74%
Previous Monthly Mortgage Payment$2,323 $2,323
New Monthly Mortgage Payment$2,937$2,740
Difference in Payments$614$417
Payment Shock26.43%17.95%
Monthly savings with nesto$197 or 32.08%
In these examples, we have chosen the lowest 5-year fixed rate available on the lenders’ websites as of March 6, 2024.

TD Bank Payment Shock

TDnesto
Mortgage Amount (at renewal)$426,000$426,000
Interest Rate5.60%4.74%
Previous Monthly Mortgage Payment$2,323 $2,323
New Monthly Mortgage Payment$2,939$2,740
Difference in Payments$616$417
Payment Shock26.52%17.95%
Monthly savings with nesto$199 or 32.31%
In these examples, we have chosen the lowest 5-year fixed rate available on the lenders’ websites as of March 6, 2024.

CIBC Payment Shock

CIBCnesto
Mortgage Amount (at renewal)$426,000$426,000
Interest Rate5.64%4.74%
Previous Monthly Mortgage Payment$2,323 $2,323
New Monthly Mortgage Payment$2,948$2,740
Difference in Payments$625$417
Payment Shock26.90%17.95%
Monthly savings with nesto$208 or 33.28%
In these examples, we have chosen the lowest 5-year fixed rate available on the lenders’ websites as of March 6, 2024.

BMO Payment Shock

BMOnesto
Mortgage Amount (at renewal)$426,000$426,000
Interest Rate5.14%4.74%
Previous Monthly Mortgage Payment$2,323 $2,323
New Monthly Mortgage Payment$2,832$2,740
Difference in Payments$509$417
Payment Shock21.91%17.95%
Monthly savings with nesto$92 or 18.07%
In these examples, we have chosen the lowest 5-year fixed rate available on the lenders’ websites as of March 6, 2024.

Scotiabank Payment Shock

Scotiabanknesto
Mortgage Amount (at renewal)$426,000$426,000
Interest Rate5.66%4.74%
Previous Monthly Mortgage Payment$2,323 $2,323
New Monthly Mortgage Payment$2,953$2,740
Difference in Payments$630$417
Payment Shock27.12%17.95%
Monthly savings with nesto$213 or 33.81%
In these examples, we have chosen the lowest 5-year fixed rate available on the lenders’ websites as of March 6, 2024.

National Bank Payment Shock

National Banknesto
Mortgage Amount (at renewal)$426,000$426,000
Interest Rate5.59%4.74%
Previous Monthly Mortgage Payment$2,323 $2,323
New Monthly Mortgage Payment$2,937$2,740
Difference in Payments$614$417
Payment Shock26.43%17.95%
Monthly savings with nesto$197 or 32.08%
In these examples, we have chosen the lowest 5-year fixed rate available on the lenders’ websites as of March 6, 2024.

Frequently Asked Questions

When are most Canadians up for mortgage renewal?

Most Canadians will renew their mortgages in 2026, with approximately $400 billion or 26% of chartered bank mortgages due for renewal.

How can I lessen the impact of rising mortgage rates at renewal?

Several strategies can help lessen the impact of higher mortgage rates at renewal. These include increasing mortgage payments, making a lump sum prepayment, and extending your amortization.

Does payment shock affect first-time homebuyers?

Payment shock can impact first-time homebuyers when they come up for renewal. Many first-time buyers who purchased in 2020 and 2021 and went with a fixed rate will face higher interest rates when their mortgages come up for renewal in the next few years. Further, many buyers during this time chose variable rates and may have already realized payment shock when they hit their trigger points as interest rates increased. Payment shock for first-time homebuyers (FTHB) could also be viewed as the change in housing costs – expressed as a difference between renting versus homeownership.

How do mortgage lenders calculate payment shock?

Mortgage lenders calculate payment shock as the difference between the new and old mortgage payments expressed as a percentage of the old mortgage payment.

Payment Shock = (New Payment – Old Payment) / Old Payment * 100

How is payment shock calculated and analyzed by mortgage underwriters?

Mortgage underwriters calculate payment shock as a percentage difference between new and old mortgage payments compared to the old mortgage payment.

Payment Shock = (New Payment – Old Payment) / Old Payment * 100

Can payment shock lead to mortgage rejection?

Payment shock can result in your mortgage being rejected when switching lenders if your debt servicing ratios are not within your new lender’s lending guidelines. Additionally, if the higher payments are not manageable for your budget, you could miss payments, affecting your credit score which could also lead to rejections upon renewal.

How nesto works

At nesto, all of our commission-free mortgage experts hold concurrent professional designations from one or more provinces. Our clients will receive the best advice and care when they speak with specialists that exceed the industry status quo. 

Unlike the industry norm, our agents are not commissioned but salaried employees. This means you’ll get free, unbiased advice on the most suitable mortgage solution for your unique needs. Our advisors are measured on the satisfaction and quality of advice they provide to their clients. 

nesto is working hard to change how the mortgage industry functions. We start with honest and transparent advice, followed by our best rates upfront. We can offer you these low rates using the fintech industry’s best-in-class and safest technology to provide a 100% digital online experience and process to reduce overhead costs.

By working remotely across Canada, all our mortgage experts and staff spend less time commuting to work and more time with their friends and family. This makes for more dedicated employees and contributes to our success with happy and satisfied clients.

nesto is on a mission to offer a positive, empowering and transparent property financing experience, simplified from start to finish.

Reach out to our licensed and knowledgeable mortgage experts to find your best mortgage rate in Canada.

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