Where Should I Live When I Move to Toronto?

Where Should I Live When I Move to Toronto?

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Are you thinking about moving to Toronto? This gorgeous, bustling city has so much to offer. To help you navigate it better, we put together a guide on the various neighbourhoods below.


Key Highlights

  • Toronto is consistently ranked as one of the most livable cities in the world, well known as an exciting, diverse, clean and safe city to call home.
  • Toronto has a diverse landscape – everything from skyscrapers to green space.
  • When compared to other major cities in the world, house and apartment prices in Toronto are reasonable, although they have increased rapidly in recent years.

Best neighbourhoods to live in Toronto

Toronto is consistently ranked as one of the most livable cities in the world, well known as an exciting, diverse, clean and safe city to call home. It’s a dynamic metropolis featuring soaring skyscrapers and the iconic free-standing CN Tower. Toronto also has many green spaces – from the oval of Queen’s Park to the 400-acre High Park with its trails, sports facilities and zoo. About 2.8 million people call Toronto home. We’ve highlighted several neighbourhoods below to help with your research and find the right neighbourhood that meets your specific needs – whether you’re looking to move to Toronto as a family or on your own.

Browse neighbourhoods by district

Toronto has a neighbourhood for everyone – whether you plan to move to the west end, downtown, midtown, east end or suburbs within the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). 

Toronto’s west end is centered around High Park – 400 acres that feature trails, sports facilities and even a zoo. The West Toronto Railpath is a multi-use asphalt trail that follows a repurposed railway line, and is a popular destination for pedestrians and cyclists. Many of the best Eastern European bakeries and food shops are situated in the west end.

Downtown Toronto is the heartbeat of the city. Many of Toronto’s most popular and highly acclaimed neighbourhoods are located downtown including West Queen West, Trinity Bellwoods, Cabbagetown and Harbourfront. Home to several professional sports teams – Raptors, Blue Jays, Maple Leafs, Toronto FC and Argonauts – downtown Toronto features world-class galleries, museums, music, ballet, theatres, hotels, restaurants and hospitals. The Path is the world’s largest underground shopping complex spanning over 30 km. Iconic downtown destinations include the Eaton Centre, Yonge Dundas Square, CN Tower, Fort York, St Lawrence Market, Distillery District, Liberty Village, Queens Park, City Hall and Toronto harbour and islands. 

Midtown Toronto is an ideal option when looking to be close to the downtown core. Many Midtown neighbourhoods run along the Bloor-Yonge subway line. Rosedale, Moore Park and Forest Hill are all touted worldwide as some of Toronto’s finest neighbourhoods. Points of interest include: Casa Loma, built-in 1911, is the largest medieval castle in Canada; Yorkville is home to many of Toronto’s exclusive restaurants, hotels, art galleries, boutiques, cafes, specialty food shops and restaurants; and Summerhill, which is a close-knit neighbourhood of antique stores, fine dining and unique shops, and features Canada’s largest liquors store (LCBO) housed within what was once Toronto’s main railway station.

The Prince Edward Viaduct (also known as the Bloor Viaduct), is a Toronto landmark and is the gateway to the east end. Toronto’s neighbourhood revitalization started in trendy Leslieville in the 1990s and spread to Riverside, Danforth Village and Riverdale. The signature neighbourhood in the east end is The Beach. Many of Toronto’s most popular events take place in the east end including Taste of the Danforth, The Beaches International Jazz Festival and the Leslieville Flea Market.

The GTA is also home to a number of Toronto suburbs such as Vaughan, Scarborough, North York and Etobicoke. Each offers close proximity to the city with several neighbourhoods that offer more of a small town feel, which is often an ideal location to raise a family. 

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West End

The Annex

Located next to the University of Toronto’s St George Campus, The Annex is a lively area that draws students to its casual eateries, indie bookshops, bars and cafes on Bloor Street West. It also has the iconic Lee’s Palace rock concert venue, the quirky Hot Docs Ted Rogers Cinema and the Royal Ontario Museum art and natural history museum. Its leafy residential streets feature stately homes.  

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 50% higher than national average

Roncesvalles

Roncesvalles is an urban community with a unique village vibe that manifests along its main street, unexpectedly named after a battle site in Spain. What’s most remarkable is the wide array of well-tended shops and gardens along its 1.8 km stretch, the many marvelous places to meet and eat, and the goodwill among neighbours and shopkeepers. 

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 29% higher than national average

Kensington

Kensington is a walkable bohemian neighbourhood that draws artists and tourists to its indie shops, vintage boutiques and arts spaces. Kensington Market is home to a wide array of specialty grocers, bakeries and cheese shops. Hipsters frequent trendy bars, cafes and international restaurants that range from casual to fine dining. Students and families populate Victorian houses along tree-lined streets. 

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 25% higher than national average

Little Italy

Although this historically Italian neighbourhood is now more diverse, its heritage is hard to mistake. You can discover some of the city’s best Italian – or Spanish – food and drink then dance at a club, people-watch from a patio or just enjoy an after-dinner stroll with a gelato.  

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 24% higher than national average

Swansea

Swansea Village is the only Toronto neighbourhood that has its own community-run Town Hall. Swansea is also the only Toronto neighbourhood to have a lake, river and pond as its natural boundaries. Swansea’s hilly terrain, winding roads and many mature trees accentuate the storybook houses that line its residential streets. 

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 17% higher than national average

Dovercourt

Dovercourt Park neighbourhood residents are mostly low to moderate income families from many different cultural backgrounds. A focal point in this neighbourhood is the Dovercourt Boys and Girls Club. Their clubhouse, located at Dovercourt Park, is open year-round, and offers a myriad of social and recreational programs for neighbourhood children. 

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 18% higher than national average

Bloordale Village

Bloordale has undergone significant changes since 2010, and was once considered one of Toronto’s up-and-coming art districts. The surrounding area is a highly diverse, mixed-income community, including Portuguese, Caribbean, Italian, Bangladeshi, Latin American, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, Burmese, Chinese and Vietnamese populations. The area has been gentrifying since the late 2000s. 

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 19% higher than national average

West Queen West

West Queen West is a trendy neighbourhood that draws artists and hipsters to its galleries, kitschy shops and indie boutiques. Home to vibrant bars, cafes and bistros, the area is also known for its offbeat street fashion and Graffiti Alley murals. Picturesque Trinity Bellwoods Park is a top leisure spot for families and dog owners, while the Drake and Gladstone “art hotels” host concerts and events.  

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 1% lower than national average

King West

King West is the ideal place for both an evening of dancing and fine dining. This formerly industrial part of Toronto is now one of the buzziest nighttime haunts that the city has to offer. You’ll find high-end stores sandwiched between ritzy restaurants and rooftop patios.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 11% higher than national average

Liberty Village

Liberty Village has a youthful, campus-meets-condo vibe. Bars, pubs, restaurants and cafes buzz with energy, especially on game nights when one of the local teams (Toronto Wolfpack and Toronto FC) take to the pitch. Liberty Village also functions as one of the city’s creative corridors with production facilities, agencies and tech firms operating out of lofts and studio spaces in converted former warehouses.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 1% higher than national average

High Park North

The High Park neighbourhood is home to a wide range of people. Its highly regarded schools, including Humberside Collegiate, attract many families with school age children to this neighbourhood. High Park contains a diverse housing mix. Families gravitate to the single-family homes in the neighbourhood, but there are also a large number of rental opportunities in High Park, which appeal to singles and couples. 

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 21% higher than national average

Parkdale

Parkdale is eclectic, artsy and ever-changing. This neighbourhood boasts a rich immigrant history, with waves of Polish, Afro-Caribbean, Filipino and Vietnamese immigrants having called it home. Today, Parkdale hosts one of North America’s largest Tibetan expat communities – and has the restaurants to prove it. Independent galleries, trendy bars and vintage shops cater to locals and visitors, while Sunnyside Beach remains a powerful draw a century after its development, circa-1922.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 19% higher than national average

The Junction

The Junction is one of Toronto’s most lively neighbourhoods, and is named because of its geography – the intersection of where four railway lines in the area meet, and its adjoining area, the Junction Triangle (extending from Lansdowne to its main strip of Sterling Road). The neighbourhood is a sought-after place to live and visit.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 14% higher than national average

Bloor West Village

Bloor West Village is a popular neighbourhood for families. It has many excellent schools and is within walking distance of High Park – Toronto’s biggest and best known park. This neighbourhood is highlighted by the Bloor West Village retail district, which attracts shoppers from all over the city.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 40% higher than national average

Chinatown

Established in 1878, Chinatown is one of Toronto’s oldest and most dynamic neighbourhoods. You’ll find bustling produce markets that spill out onto the street, numerous shops and food stalls, neon signs and a plethora of cuisines (not only Chinese – there’s a strong Vietnamese contingent too, for instance).

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 9% higher than national average

Downtown

Yorkville

Glamourous Yorkville is home to the “Mink Mile” – a strip of Bloor Street West dotted with prestigious designer boutiques like Dolce & Gabbana, Gucci, Prada and Louis Vuitton. Around the corner, you’ll find Chanel, plus a selection of chic restaurants and discreet medi-spas. Luxe Yorkville was once a hippie enclave and its artistic roots can be seen in a small handful of upscale galleries that still remain.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 28% higher than national average

Downtown Core

The core of downtown Toronto is located along Yonge Street from Queen Street to College Street. There is a large cluster of retail centres and shops in the area, including the Toronto Eaton Centre indoor mall.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 14% higher than national average

Fashion & Entertainment District

The Fashion, Entertainment & Financial Districts, along with Yonge-Dundas to the north, form the heart of Toronto’s downtown. By day, the suits and powerbrokers of the Financial District drive the city’s economy from their glass and steel towers. But as night comes, the towers empty and people pour into the Fashion & Entertainment District to shop, catch the show, see the game or party at the clubs. Whether it’s day or night, many of Toronto’s larger attractions are located here, so it’s an essential part of Toronto. 

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 12% higher than national average

Queens Quay & Spadina

Queens Quay & Spadina is a prominent area in the Harbourfront neighbourhood. This area was originally commercial in nature due to the many working piers along the waterfront. Parts of it have been extensively rebuilt since the 1970s with parks, condominiums and retail, as well as institutional and cultural development.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 12% higher than national average

Midtown

Yonge & Eglinton

This trending neighbourhood known for its stellar shopping and casual dining options boasts top-rated ramen and taco restaurants, and a slew of trendy decor and fashion shops. The nearby Eglinton Park offers a beautiful contradiction to the bustle, with its sports fields, tennis courts, playground and an ice rink (during winter months).

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 42% higher than national average

Davisville Village & Mount Pleasant

This centrally located neighbourhood is popular with singles, young couples and families. It’s best known for its excellent recreational facilities, outstanding shopping districts and active nightlife, which includes bars, restaurants and movie theatres.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 20% higher than national average

Eglinton West

Since the 1950s, this area has been a hub for the Jamaican and wider Caribbean communities in Toronto. Walking along Eglinton Avenue West, you can immerse yourself in the culture with West Indian food, local grocers and independent stores selling specialty goods.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 5% higher than national average

East End

Danforth-Greektown

The strip of Danforth Avenue traditionally known as Greektown has evolved into a diverse community hub of multicultural cuisine, shops and independent grocers. It’s still home to one of the largest Greek communities in North America. Street signs are in English as well as modern Greek, and several scenes from My Big Fat Greek Wedding were filmed there.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 4% higher than national average

Leslieville

Leslieville has a family-friendly yet hip atmosphere that’s made it one of the city’s most sought-after neighbourhoods for young families to live, and among the most fun to visit. Locals flock there for weekend brunch, and foodies for the numerous restaurant and bar options. In summer, there are several block party-style events like the Leslieville Beer Fest.  

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 9% higher than national average

Little India

South Asian culture abounds in this vibrant neighbourhood, where hole-in-the-wall “chaat houses” (serving traditional Indian street food) co-exist with trendy new brewpubs and art galleries. The jewel-in-crown of the area is the Gerrard India Bazaar – the biggest South Asian market in North America, packed with jewelry, furnishings, spices and silks.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 8% higher than national average

Moss Park

Moss Park is one of Toronto’s largest public housing projects. It’s situated in the poorest part of the city. The Salvation Army Hostel is located across the street from Moss Park at the corner of Sherbourne and Queen Streets. The Moss Park neighbourhood is anchored on the west side by a large public park, which also happens to be the home of the Moss Park Armoury – a training centre for the Canadian Armed Forces.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 19% higher than national average

The Village

The traditional gathering place for Toronto’s LGBTQ+ community, The Village (also known as Church-Wellesley Village), is a pleasant residential and shopping neighbourhood by day and a hopping entertainment destination at night. Proudly known as the Toronto Gay Village, the neighbourhood is inclusive, safe and welcoming for all. You’ll find the LGBTQ+ district of Toronto busiest during the Pride Toronto festival each June when the whole neighbourhood transforms into one big, friendly party.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 6% higher than national average

East Chinatown

East Chinatown is a smaller Chinese neighbourhood located in the city of Toronto’s east end in Riverdale. There are several Chinatowns in Toronto.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 22% higher than national average

Cabbagetown

Cabbagetown is one of Toronto’s most popular neighbourhoods. Its residents come from a wide variety of backgrounds that all share a strong sense of community spirit and pride in their neighbourhood. This community spirit is put on display every September during the Cabbagetown Fall Festival that runs for an entire weekend and features a mini marathon, historical walking tours, parade and community-wide yard sale.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 25% higher than national average

Riverdale

Riverdale is the gateway to Toronto’s east-end neighbourhoods. It’s a large and diverse community that’s well known for its colourful shopping districts and quaint Victorian homes. This is a high density urban neighbourhood that is also blessed with an abundance of parkland where one can escape the hustle and bustle of big city living. Riverdale Park is one of the largest green spaces in the city, and its steep hills are a favourite for tobogganers. Withrow Park is a neighbourhood hub and meeting place with a popular farmers’ market. Top ranked schools, great shopping and convenient access to public transit have attracted many families to this popular neighbourhood.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 9% higher than national average

Corktown

Corktown is popular with young professionals who value this downtown location for its convenience to Toronto’s business and entertainment districts. Many of Corktown’s commercial buildings have been converted into live-work studios, condominium lofts and professional offices, which has given this neighbourhood an added charm and vitality. Neighbourhood landmarks include the historic Little Trinity Church and the Enoch Turner Schoolhouse. Corktown Common and Underpass Park are newer parks that have won awards for their design. Underpass Park hosts a popular farmers’ market.

Median home price: $1,357,500

Median household income: $84,000

Cost of living is 12% higher than national average

Toronto Suburbs

Vaughan

The City of Vaughan is part of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). It’s located in York Region, just north of Toronto. Vaughan was the fastest-growing municipality in Canada between 1996 and 2006 with its population increasing by 80.2% during this time period and having nearly doubled in population since 1991. Vaughan is made up of the following five communities: Concord; Kleinburg; Maple; Thornhill; and Woodbridge. 

Median home price: $1,205,181

Median household income: $105,357

Cost of living is 15% higher than national average

Scarborough

Scarborough is a district of Toronto that features a large, multicultural area containing the Scarborough Bluffs – huge cliffs overlooking Lake Ontario, lined with parks, beaches and hiking trails. Inland, the sprawling Toronto Zoo includes global animal pavilions, close-up encounters and a wildlife health centre. The area is also known for its diverse spread of restaurants, including regional Southeast Asian, Chinese and Indian cuisine.

Median home price: $852,846

Median household income: $75,158

Cost of living is the same as the national average

North York

North York is a district of Toronto that features an eclectic, multicultural home to the hands-on Ontario Science Centre and the Aga Khan Museum, with exhibits on Islamic culture in a striking modern building. In the area’s north, Black Creek Pioneer Village is an 1800s living museum. Sprawling Downsview Park includes a lake, event spaces, and a flea and farmers’ market, while Edwards Gardens has a greenhouse, fountains and botanical gardens.

Median household income: $1,103,464

Cost of living is 6% lower than national average

Etobicoke

Etobicoke is a district of Toronto that’s home to several lakefront parks, golf courses and vast Centennial Park, with a conservatory featuring tropical plants. The 1830s Montgomery’s Inn has a museum, tearoom and pub, and hosts a weekly farmers’ market. Islington-City Centre West area is a busy commercial hub, containing shopping complexes and casual chain eateries, plus history-themed murals along Dundas Street West.

Median home price: $973,692

Median household income: $87,588

Cost of living is 15% higher than national average

FAQ

Following are some answers to popular questions about living in Toronto that should help with your decision about where to move within the city.

Which part of Toronto is best to live in?

The part of Toronto that’s best to live in really depends on your personal or family needs and budget. There’s truly a place for everyone within the Greater Toronto Area (GTA).

What is the best suburb to live in Toronto?

The best Toronto suburb to live in really depends on your personal or family needs and budget. There’s truly a place for everyone within the Greater Toronto Area (GTA).


Is moving to Toronto worth it?

Yes, moving to Toronto is worth it. If you’re looking for a vibrant city that has access to everything and a healthy lifestyle, Toronto should be on top of your list. Boasting the largest population in Canada, it’s a hub for multiple things. Often called New York North, the city offers a perfect blend of the business, cultural and entertainment worlds.

How much should I save before moving to Toronto?

It’s best to save as much as you can before moving to Toronto when compared to other cities in Canada. But, when compared to other major cities in the world, house and apartment prices in Toronto are reasonable, although they have increased rapidly in recent years. Prices vary from area to area.

Final thoughts

If you’re planning to move to Toronto, you have a lot of great communities from which to call home. Every neighbourhood offers something unique – from rich culture and child-friendly living to excellent green spaces and amenities. 


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